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How To Use Transfer Tape on Cricut Projects

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All Cricut Beginners NEED to know how to use Transfer Tape on Cricut Projects. I am going to help you step by step and watch the video tutorial. It’s super easy!

How to Use Transfer Tape – The Video Tutorial

This is a simple and short video on how to use transfer Tape on Cricut projects. 

Now on to the step by step in text form. This is for my peeps that love to read the instructions.

How to Use Transfer Tape – Step by Step Tutorial

Once your project is cut out using your Cricut machine, now is the time to weed it.

What is weeding? Check out my blog post showing you what weeding is and how to do it. Yes, there is a video tutorial there as well.

Once your weeding is done, it’s time to grab your transfer tape. 

Learn how to use Transfer tape

With your project in front of you, put your transfer tape over the top of it. Rub it from one side to the other. We are trying to keep it from getting bubbles or to wrinkle the vinyl.

Transfer tape is used for most projects

Take your scraper or roller and rub or roll over the top of the vinyl gently. You are trying to get the bubbles out and for the vinyl to grab onto the transfer tape so it will transfer the vinyl from its backing sheet to the transfer tape. 

Sometimes it doesn’t want to leave its backing sheet, so it takes some work to get it off. Just keep working with it to convince it to come off.

Once you think it is firmly on, turn the project over and start removing the transfer tape from the vinyl backing. Start with a corner and gently start removing it.

Go slow and watch to be sure the vinyl is lifting off the vinyl backing and getting on the transfer sheet.

DONE…whewwww

Did it work? Yahoo! That wasn’t too hard, right?

Now it’s time to put the vinyl on your project.

Put Vinyl on Cricut Project from Transfer Tape

Reverse the process now for your project. Whether it’s a wall, wood, metal or whatever it is you are putting this on. 

Place your vinyl over your project material. Center it or place it where you want it.  Take your scraper or your roller and rub the vinyl on to the material, just like you did to get the vinyl from its backing to the transfer tape.

When you think it is secure, slowly pull the transfer tape off, watching carefully that all of your image or text is coming off on the project.

Sometimes it needs a little help. If it isn’t coming off, put the transfer tape back over that part again and rub it a little bit. Hopefully the extra rub and the warmth of your hands will convince it to come off the transfer tape and adhere to your project.

That should be it. Do you love it? Did it turn out like you wanted?

Now that you have mastered how to Transfer tape, it’s time to practice this new talent on  more projects

Facts About Transfer Tape

Transfer Tape is also called Transfer Paper. Both are correct.

Transfer tape comes in several different forms.

Paper Transfer Tape – Some transfer tape really is made of paper. This is not a transfer tape you can use over and over again.  It’s perfect for curved projects like glasses or vases. I don’t have a picture of the Paper Transfer Paper….sorry.

Strong Grip Transfer Tape – This is extra sticky or strong transfer tape. The only time I have found I need this is on glitter vinyl. Sometimes my glitter vinyl will come with a small sheet of strong transfer tape. Sweet!

Regular Transfer Tape – This is the normal transfer tape we usually use. It is good for just about everything.  Cricut has their own brand of regular transfer tape. I prefer Oracal MT80P. 

Transfer tape can be used over and over again till the stickiness is gone. After you use it, just put the backing on again and store away till you need it again.

If your Cricut mat gets a lot of lint on it and you don’t want to take time to clean it, take an old piece of transfer tape and dab it all over the mat. That should take some of the lint off so you can use it.

Now you know how to use transfer tape…go try it for yourself!

Now that you have mastered how to use transfer tape, it’s time to practice this new talent on more projects.

Happy Crafting!

Bren with Addicted to Cricut

Related: How to use the Slice Tool in Cricut Design Space

How to Add Fonts to Your iPad for Cricut
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